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1st QUESTION: The speaker has said that going to an office everyday from nine to five is an intolerable imprisonment. But in any society all kinds of jobs have to be done. Is K's teaching therefore only for the few?

You have understood? Shall I read it again? The speaker has said that human society is so constructed throughout the world that most people are occupied with jobs, pleasant or unpleasant, from nine to five everyday of their life. And he said also that it is an intolerable imprisonment. I don't know how you feel about it. Probably you like being in prison, probably you like your jobs from nine o'clock to five o'clock, rushing, rushing back and all the rest of it. What shall we do? To the speaker he wouldn't tolerate it for a single minute - for the speaker. I would rather do something which would be pleasant, helpful and necessary to earn enough money and so on. But most of us accept this prison, this routine - right? We accept it. So what shall we do? Nobody, as far as one is capable of sufficient observation, nobody has questioned this. We say it is normal, it is the way of society, it is the way of our life, it is the way we must live. But if we all see together that such an imprisonment, which it is actually, that we all feel it is intolerable, not just verbally but actually do something about it we will create a new society - right? We will if all of us say we will not tolerate for a single day this routine, this monstrous activity of nine to five, however necessary, however good and pleasant, then we will bring about not only psychological revolution but also outwardly. Right? We may agree about this but will we do it? You might say, "No, I can't do it because I have responsibility, I have children, I have a house and mortgage, insurance" - thank god I haven't got any of those! And so you might say, "It is easy for you to talk about all this." But it is easy for the speaker to talk about it because he refuses to go in that pattern. From boyhood he refused it.

Jiddu Krishnamurti - Brockwood Park 2nd Public Question & Answer Meeting 30th August 1979

Continue reading here: http://www.jiddu-krishnamurti.net/en/1979/1979-08-30-jiddu-krishnamurti-2nd-public-question-and-answer-meeting

1st QUESTION: The speaker has said that going to an office everyday from nine to five is an intolerable imprisonment. But in any society all kinds of jobs have to be done. Is K's teaching therefore only for the few?

You have understood? Shall I read it again? The speaker has said that human society is so constructed throughout the world that most people are occupied with jobs, pleasant or unpleasant, from nine to five everyday of their life. And he said also that it is an intolerable imprisonment. I don't know how you feel about it. Probably you like being in prison, probably you like your jobs from nine o'clock to five o'clock, rushing, rushing back and all the rest of it. What shall we do? To the speaker he wouldn't tolerate it for a single minute - for the speaker. I would rather do something which would be pleasant, helpful and necessary to earn enough money and so on. But most of us accept this prison, this routine - right? We accept it. So what shall we do? Nobody, as far as one is capable of sufficient observation, nobody has questioned this. We say it is normal, it is the way of society, it is the way of our life, it is the way we must live. But if we all see together that such an imprisonment, which it is actually, that we all feel it is intolerable, not just verbally but actually do something about it we will create a new society - right? We will if all of us say we will not tolerate for a single day this routine, this monstrous activity of nine to five, however necessary, however good and pleasant, then we will bring about not only psychological revolution but also outwardly. Right? We may agree about this but will we do it? You might say, "No, I can't do it because I have responsibility, I have children, I have a house and mortgage, insurance" - thank god I haven't got any of those! And so you might say, "It is easy for you to talk about all this." But it is easy for the speaker to talk about it because he refuses to go in that pattern. From boyhood he refused it.

Jiddu Krishnamurti - Brockwood Park 2nd Public Question & Answer Meeting 30th August 1979

Continue reading here: http://www.jiddu-krishnamurti.net/en/1979/1979-08-30-jiddu-krishnamurti-2nd-public-question-and-answer-meeting

YouTube Video UEx6TTlzU1lOV2NoZGk0SWtQT0RxZWMtU1I3OWJXaDVaSS44MjZDNDYzQjgwQzkzQzkz

Jiddu Krishnamurti - Most people are occupied with jobs

[Original Airdate: November 18, 2016]

Mike Gousha, Distinguished Fellow in Law and Public Policy at the Marquette University Law School, talks to Dr. Tim Snyder, Bird White Housum Professor of History at Yale University, about Adolf Hitler's political dogma as outlined in his new book "Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning."


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ABOUT MILWAUKEE PBS
Milwaukee PBS is an award-winning multimedia producer and broadcaster of exceptional and meaningful local and national content. Licensed to Milwaukee Area Technical College, Milwaukee PBS is one of the highest-rated PBS stations in the country. Our unique, independent position in the community makes us the ideal source of community engagement as a storyteller, conversation facilitator and advocate. No matter where you come from or where you make your home, we encourage you to bring your world and Milwaukee into focus as a member of the Milwaukee PBS community.


Subscribe to Milwaukee PBS on YouTube ►► https://bit.ly/2pESb9F

Support Milwaukee PBS by becoming a member! ►► https://bit.ly/35UGfB6

https://www.milwaukeepbs.org/
https://www.facebook.com/MilwaukeePBS/
https://twitter.com/milwpbs
https://www.instagram.com/milwaukeepbs/

ABOUT MILWAUKEE PBS
Milwaukee PBS is an award-winning multimedia producer and broadcaster of exceptional and meaningful local and national content. Licensed to Milwaukee Area Technical College, Milwaukee PBS is one of the highest-rated PBS stations in the country. Our unique, independent position in the community makes us the ideal source of community engagement as a storyteller, conversation facilitator and advocate. No matter where you come from or where you make your home, we encourage you to bring your world and Milwaukee into focus as a member of the Milwaukee PBS community.

[Original Airdate: November 18, 2016]

Mike Gousha, Distinguished Fellow in Law and Public Policy at the Marquette University Law School, talks to Dr. Tim Snyder, Bird White Housum Professor of History at Yale University, about Adolf Hitler's political dogma as outlined in his new book "Black Earth: The Holocaust as History and Warning."


Subscribe to Milwaukee PBS on YouTube ►► https://bit.ly/2pESb9F

Support Milwaukee PBS by becoming a member! ►► https://bit.ly/35UGfB6

https://www.milwaukeepbs.org/
https://www.facebook.com/MilwaukeePBS/
https://twitter.com/milwpbs
https://www.instagram.com/milwaukeepbs/

ABOUT MILWAUKEE PBS
Milwaukee PBS is an award-winning multimedia producer and broadcaster of exceptional and meaningful local and national content. Licensed to Milwaukee Area Technical College, Milwaukee PBS is one of the highest-rated PBS stations in the country. Our unique, independent position in the community makes us the ideal source of community engagement as a storyteller, conversation facilitator and advocate. No matter where you come from or where you make your home, we encourage you to bring your world and Milwaukee into focus as a member of the Milwaukee PBS community.


Subscribe to Milwaukee PBS on YouTube ►► https://bit.ly/2pESb9F

Support Milwaukee PBS by becoming a member! ►► https://bit.ly/35UGfB6

https://www.milwaukeepbs.org/
https://www.facebook.com/MilwaukeePBS/
https://twitter.com/milwpbs
https://www.instagram.com/milwaukeepbs/

ABOUT MILWAUKEE PBS
Milwaukee PBS is an award-winning multimedia producer and broadcaster of exceptional and meaningful local and national content. Licensed to Milwaukee Area Technical College, Milwaukee PBS is one of the highest-rated PBS stations in the country. Our unique, independent position in the community makes us the ideal source of community engagement as a storyteller, conversation facilitator and advocate. No matter where you come from or where you make your home, we encourage you to bring your world and Milwaukee into focus as a member of the Milwaukee PBS community.

YouTube Video UEx6TTlzU1lOV2NoZGk0SWtQT0RxZWMtU1I3OWJXaDVaSS45NkM5QURGMTI1Rjg4NDRC

On the Issues with Mike Gousha | Program | Timothy Snyder

John Brown’s Body Abolition Democracy Against Perpetual War – Robin DG Kelley (Morrison Lecture '15)

http://www.mslaw.edu   Hiroshima, War, Patriotism, Civil Rights  and American Exceptionalism. An intimate interview with historian Howard Zinn.

In this presentation of The Massachusetts School of Law's program, Books of Our Times, Dean Lawrence R. Velvel interviews American Historian Howard Zinn on his books: You Can't Be Neutral on a Moving Train - A personal History of Our Times, and Failure To Quit - Reflections of an Optimistic Historian. The discussion ranges from Mr. Zinn's optimism for the future and what true Patriotism is, to terrorism and what Americans don't want to hear and the myth of American Exceptionalism.

The Massachusetts School of Law at Andover also presents information on important current affairs to the general public in television and radio broadcasts, an intellectual journal, conferences, author appearances, blogs and books.


THE MASSACHUSETTS SCHOOL OF LAW IS NEW ENGLAND’S MOST AFFORDABLE AND DIVERSE LAW SCHOOL. We are dedicated to growing tomorrow’s leaders; empowering them with professional skills taught by instructors with real world experience, in a fun supportive campus environment.   
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➡YOUR FUTURE STARTS HERE!  Learn More at http://MSLaw.EDU 


Connect with MSLaw:

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Visit our site:  http://MSLaw.edu


and - Subscribe to our Videos!  http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=mslawdotedu

-~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
The History of Iran / US Relations: "American Imperialism - Stephen Kinzer on Overthrow Part 2: Vietnam, Iran and Chile" 
➨ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y7wECccLRec
-~-~~-~~~-~~-~-

http://www.mslaw.edu Hiroshima, War, Patriotism, Civil Rights and American Exceptionalism. An intimate interview with historian Howard Zinn.

In this presentation of The Massachusetts School of Law's program, Books of Our Times, Dean Lawrence R. Velvel interviews American Historian Howard Zinn on his books: You Can't Be Neutral on a Moving Train - A personal History of Our Times, and Failure To Quit - Reflections of an Optimistic Historian. The discussion ranges from Mr. Zinn's optimism for the future and what true Patriotism is, to terrorism and what Americans don't want to hear and the myth of American Exceptionalism.

The Massachusetts School of Law at Andover also presents information on important current affairs to the general public in television and radio broadcasts, an intellectual journal, conferences, author appearances, blogs and books.


THE MASSACHUSETTS SCHOOL OF LAW IS NEW ENGLAND’S MOST AFFORDABLE AND DIVERSE LAW SCHOOL. We are dedicated to growing tomorrow’s leaders; empowering them with professional skills taught by instructors with real world experience, in a fun supportive campus environment.
_

➡YOUR FUTURE STARTS HERE! Learn More at http://MSLaw.EDU


Connect with MSLaw:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MSLAndover
Twitter: http://Twitter.com/EDU_video
Visit our site: http://MSLaw.edu


and - Subscribe to our Videos! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=mslawdotedu

-~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
The History of Iran / US Relations: "American Imperialism - Stephen Kinzer on Overthrow Part 2: Vietnam, Iran and Chile"
➨ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y7wECccLRec
-~-~~-~~~-~~-~-

YouTube Video UEx6TTlzU1lOV2NoZGk0SWtQT0RxZWMtU1I3OWJXaDVaSS43OEM5M0IwMkQ1MzBCMUI1

Howard Zinn - You Can't Be Neutral on a Moving Train- A People's History

DEBT: The First 5,000 Years

While the "national debt" has been the concern du jour of many economists, commentators and politicians, little attention is ever paid to the historical significance of debt.

For thousands of years, the struggle between rich and poor has largely taken the form of conflicts between creditors and debtors—of arguments about the rights and wrongs of interest payments, debt peonage, amnesty, repossession, restitution, the sequestering of sheep, the seizing of vineyards, and the selling of debtors' children into slavery. By the same token, for the past five thousand years, popular insurrections have begun the same way: with the ritual destruction of debt records—tablets, papyri, ledgers; whatever form they might have taken in any particular time and place.

Enter anthropologist David Graeber's Debt: The First 5,000 Years (July, ISBN 978-1-933633-86-2), which uses these struggles to show that the history of debt is also a history of morality and culture.

In the throes of the recent economic crisis, with the very defining institutions of capitalism crumbling, surveys showed that an overwhelming majority of Americans felt that the country's banks should not be rescued—whatever the economic consequences—but that ordinary citizens stuck with bad mortgages should be bailed out. The notion of morality as a matter of paying one's debts runs deeper in the United States than in almost any other country.

Beginning with a sharp critique of economics (which since Adam Smith has erroneously argued that all human economies evolved out of barter), Graeber carefully shows that everything from the ancient work of law and religion to human notions like "guilt," "sin," and "redemption," are deeply influenced by ancients debates about credit and debt.

It is no accident that debt continues to fuel political debate, from the crippling debt crises that have gripped Greece and Ireland, to our own debate over whether to raise the debt ceiling. Debt, an incredibly captivating narrative spanning 5,000 years, puts these crises into their full context and illuminates one of the thorniest subjects in all of history.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

David Graeber teaches anthropology at Goldsmiths College, University of London. He is the author of Towards an Anthropological Theory of Value, Lost People, and Possibilities: Essays on Hierarchy, Rebellion, and Desire.

This talk was hosted by Boris Debic on behalf of the Authors@Google program.

DEBT: The First 5,000 Years

While the "national debt" has been the concern du jour of many economists, commentators and politicians, little attention is ever paid to the historical significance of debt.

For thousands of years, the struggle between rich and poor has largely taken the form of conflicts between creditors and debtors—of arguments about the rights and wrongs of interest payments, debt peonage, amnesty, repossession, restitution, the sequestering of sheep, the seizing of vineyards, and the selling of debtors' children into slavery. By the same token, for the past five thousand years, popular insurrections have begun the same way: with the ritual destruction of debt records—tablets, papyri, ledgers; whatever form they might have taken in any particular time and place.

Enter anthropologist David Graeber's Debt: The First 5,000 Years (July, ISBN 978-1-933633-86-2), which uses these struggles to show that the history of debt is also a history of morality and culture.

In the throes of the recent economic crisis, with the very defining institutions of capitalism crumbling, surveys showed that an overwhelming majority of Americans felt that the country's banks should not be rescued—whatever the economic consequences—but that ordinary citizens stuck with bad mortgages should be bailed out. The notion of morality as a matter of paying one's debts runs deeper in the United States than in almost any other country.

Beginning with a sharp critique of economics (which since Adam Smith has erroneously argued that all human economies evolved out of barter), Graeber carefully shows that everything from the ancient work of law and religion to human notions like "guilt," "sin," and "redemption," are deeply influenced by ancients debates about credit and debt.

It is no accident that debt continues to fuel political debate, from the crippling debt crises that have gripped Greece and Ireland, to our own debate over whether to raise the debt ceiling. Debt, an incredibly captivating narrative spanning 5,000 years, puts these crises into their full context and illuminates one of the thorniest subjects in all of history.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

David Graeber teaches anthropology at Goldsmiths College, University of London. He is the author of Towards an Anthropological Theory of Value, Lost People, and Possibilities: Essays on Hierarchy, Rebellion, and Desire.

This talk was hosted by Boris Debic on behalf of the Authors@Google program.

YouTube Video UEx6TTlzU1lOV2NoZGk0SWtQT0RxZWMtU1I3OWJXaDVaSS41OURENDc2NEM1MDI5Mjky

Debt: The First 5,000 Years | David Graeber | Talks at Google